RED FOX DANCING

Shamanism in Brief   

Contemporary Shaminism

Everything We Have Been Taught About Our Origins Is A Lie - Malta Now →

runedogma:

Human history may have to be pushed back to the age of the Dinosaurs, calling into question everything we know about natural history, geography etc. Native Americans, and Hindu Brahmins say I told you so.

(via havamal93)

— 1 month ago with 9 notes
Shamanic Traditions Rites and Songs Among the Mongolian Buryats →

(Source: ritual-specialists)

— 1 month ago with 14 notes
Some (not so) minor changes →

ritual-specialists:

The url of the blog has been changed from eurasian-shamanism to ritual-specialists.
Title also went from Eurasian Shamanism to Ritual specialists of Eurasia. Description and mass post modification are coming soon!

I’ve been meaning to do this for a while, but the main issue was that I really,…

— 1 month ago with 13 notes
The Strange and Mysterious History of the Ouija Board →

falloutshelter7:

In February, 1891, the first few advertisements started appearing in papers: “Ouija, the Wonderful Talking Board,” boomed a Pittsburgh toy and novelty shop, describing a magical device that answered questions “about the past, present and future with marvelous accuracy” and promised “never-failing amusement and recreation for all the classes,” a link “between the known and unknown, the material and immaterial.” Another advertisement in a New York newspaper declared it “interesting and mysterious” and testified, “as sProven at Patent Office before it was allowed. Price, $1.50.

This mysterious talking board was basically what’s sold in board game aisles today: A flat board with the letters of the alphabet arrayed in two semi-circles above the numbers 0 through 9; the words “yes” and “no” in the uppermost corners, “goodbye” at the bottom; accompanied by a “planchette,” a teardrop-shaped device, usually with a small window in the body, used to maneuver about the board. The idea was that two or more people would sit around the board, place their finger tips on the planchette, pose a question, and watch, dumbfounded, as the planchette moved from letter to letter, spelling out the answers seemingly of its own accord. The biggest difference is in the materials; the board is now usually cardboard, rather than wood, and the planchette is plastic.

Though truth in advertising is hard to come by, especially in products from the 19th century, the Ouija board was “interesting and mysterious”; it actually had been “proven” to work at the Patent Office before its patent was allowed to proceed; and today, even psychologists believe that it may offer a link between the known and the unknown.

The real history of the Ouija board is just about as mysterious as how the “game” works. Ouija historian Robert Murch has been researching the story of the board since 1992; when he started his research, he says, no one really knew anything about its origins, which struck him as odd: “For such an iconic thing that strikes both fear and wonder in American culture, how can no one know where it came from?”




Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/the-strange-and-mysterious-history-of-the-ouija-board-5860627/#PSdgioIDyv1BeXMT.99
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(via old-prepper)

— 1 month ago with 4 notes

tumuseum:

Huginn and Muninn are a pair of ravens that fly all over the world, Midgard, and bring information to the god Odin.

Viking amulet, IX - X centuries.

(via guthbrand)

— 2 months ago with 497 notes
eurasian-shamanism:

I copied this photo from a friends collection of shaman-y images, so I couldn’t find out much about it - like who has taken it and where -, but I’m pretty certain* that this outfit belonged to Tubyaku Kosterkin. Tubyaku, along with his brother, Demnime, are regarded as the last great shamans of the Nganasan people.————————————*I have a photo of his son wearing what appears to be the same robe, and the second photo on this page seems to depict this outfit. Granted, it’s a very poor quality image, but the shape of the headdress and the location of the metal bits are an exact match.

eurasian-shamanism:

I copied this photo from a friends collection of shaman-y images, so I couldn’t find out much about it - like who has taken it and where -, but I’m pretty certain* that this outfit belonged to Tubyaku Kosterkin. Tubyaku, along with his brother, Demnime, are regarded as the last great shamans of the Nganasan people.
————————————
*I have a photo of his son wearing what appears to be the same robe, and the second photo on this page seems to depict this outfit. Granted, it’s a very poor quality image, but the shape of the headdress and the location of the metal bits are an exact match.

(Source: ritual-specialists, via the-fugitive)

— 2 months ago with 65 notes
oursoulsaredamned:

relic of first recorded possessed nun.

oursoulsaredamned:

relic of first recorded possessed nun.

(via mostlysignssomeportents)

— 2 months ago with 264 notes
kolvihervor:

I made some Ogham Staves ✨🌿

kolvihervor:

I made some Ogham Staves ✨🌿

(via takebacktheplanet)

— 2 months ago with 458 notes